Why this blog

It was Bertrand Russell (or maybe Bernard Shaw in one of his long introductions) who wondered what an overthrown official would do thereafter. In ancient Greece, he speculated, the deposed official would round up mercenaries and attack his city state. The unseated Chinese civil servant, he added, would retire to the hills and write poetry. A retired Indian bureaucrat, I believe, would write his memoirs or set up an NGO. Continue reading “Why this blog”

Best Books on Keynes

Keynes on the cover of TIME

No other economist would have probably had more books written on his life than John Maynard Keynes. I am currently reading, slipping in time whenever I can, a recent book by Zachary D. Carter, “The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes” (Random House, New York, 2020). I hope to able to write a brief review of the book soon. Continue reading “Best Books on Keynes”

Andrew Bailey at Jackson Hole

Central bank balance sheet as a policy tool: past, present and future

Andrew Bailey

Mr. Andrew Bailey, Governor, Bank of England, delivered the opening remarks on the second day of the Kansas City Fed’s annual Jackson Hole Symposium, on 28 August 2020. He spoke on “Central bank balance sheet as a policy tool: past, present and future”, based on a paper (see here) with the same title, prepared jointly with Jonathan Bridges, Richard Harrison, Josh Jones and Aakash Mankodi. Continue reading “Andrew Bailey at Jackson Hole”

Jerome Powell at Jackson Hole

Jerome Powell

Delivering the opening remarks at the Kansas City Fed’s annual Jackson Hole Symposium on 27 August 2020, Jerome Powell, Chair, Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System, discussed the first ever review of the FED’s monetary policy framework. Earlier in the day, the FED had released a revised Statement on Longer-Run Goals and Monetary Policy Strategy, which laid down its goals, framework for monetary policy, and would serve as the foundation for policy actions. Continue reading “Jerome Powell at Jackson Hole”

The Jackson Hole Symposium 2020

The annual Jackson Hole Symposium, organised by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, kicked off today, 27 August 2020, in what is perhaps the first instance that the Symposium is being held completely online, since its beginning in 1978. The event otherwise is held every year at Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It brings together economists, financial market participants, academics, U.S. government representatives and news media to discuss long-term policy issues of mutual concern. Continue reading “The Jackson Hole Symposium 2020”

IMF’s Central Bank Transparency Code

When increased independence was being given to central banks across the world, especially in their conduct of monetary policy, and in countries implementing an inflation targeting framework, a key element was greater accountability of central banks, in which transparency and appropriate disclosures had a very important role. Transparency refers to the flow and accessibility of information from the central bank to its stakeholders and the public. They rely on that information to inform their judgment of the performance of the central bank and compliance with the central bank’s mandate. Transparency is also a key plank in the central bank’s broader governance and accountability framework. Continue reading “IMF’s Central Bank Transparency Code”

“Pandemic depression”: The way ahead

Vincent and Carmen Reinhart

In the October/November 2020 issue of Foreign Affairs, Carmen Reinhart of the World Bank and Vincent Reinhart, Chief Economist for BNY Mellon Asset Management, have this article on “The Pandemic Depression: The Global Economy Will Never Be the Same.” They cite various data to justify the expression. Bank of England had predicted the steepest decline for UK since 1706. The unemployment figures in the US are the worst since the Bureau of Labor Statistics has had data on it. The World Trade Organization estimated that global trade is poised to fall by between 13 and 32 percent in 2020. And the World Bank had predicted that the global economy would shrink by 5.2 per cent in 2020, and that 60 million people will be pushed into extreme poverty as a result of the pandemic. Continue reading ““Pandemic depression”: The way ahead”

The Wolfsberg Group and Effectiveness in AML Compliance

Château Wolfsberg

The Wolfsberg Group is a private initiative of thirteen global banks aimed at developing frameworks and guidance for the management of financial crime risks, particularly with respect to Know Your Customer, Anti-Money Laundering and Counter Terrorist Financing policies. Continue reading “The Wolfsberg Group and Effectiveness in AML Compliance”

Governor Brainard on Digital Currencies

Governor Lael Brainard

Governor Lael Brainard of the US Federal Reserve, speaking at the Federal Reserve Bank of  San Francisco’s Innovation Office Hours, on 13 August 2020, gave an update on the work on Central Bank Digital Currencies in the US. She is a former Assistant and Associate Professor at MIT, and an Under Secretary in the Department of Treasury under the Obama administration. Continue reading “Governor Brainard on Digital Currencies”

Shiller’s Narrative Economics

Robert Shiller starts one of his lectures writing “RITUPARNA” on the board, asking the students who it was. Nobody knew. In Mahabharata, King Rituparna gave Nala, disguised as Bahuka, his charioteer, an estimate of the leaves and fruits on the branches of the Vibhitaka tree, and those on the ground. Nala counted and confirmed the estimate. Rituparna would teach Nala the art of gambling in exchange for the skills of a charioteer. Continue reading “Shiller’s Narrative Economics”

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